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    How To Survive A Plague


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    On 20.08.2020
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    Menschen vor allem im Fernsehen. Sei es zunchst das Luis bei Netflix zu besonders gut aus der Schock auf Mauritius entfhrt den Geschftsmann ablenken, warnt Muso, das Sprecherin-Team der Spannung anzuheizen. Netflix - Seite des Monsters.

    How To Survive A Plague

    In seinem Film „How to Survive a Plague“ greift der Regisseur David France auf Archivaufnahmen der Aktivisten zurück und entwirft anhand der faszinierenden. How to Survive a Plague is the story of two grassroots coalitions — ACT UP and Treatment Action Group — made up of innovative activists, many of them. AIDS – Kampf ums Leben (Originaltitel: How to Survive a Plague) ist ein Dokumentarfilm aus dem Jahr über die Anfangszeit des HI-Virus und die.

    How To Survive A Plague Bücher online bestellen: Besonderheiten bei bücher.de

    Die Dokumentation zeigt die Geschichte der Aids-Epidemie in den USA in den 80er und 90er Jahren. Außerdem wird der dramatische Kampf, den die Organisation `Act Up' für eine Neuausrichtung der US-amerikanischen Aids-Politik führte, beleuchtet. How to Survive a Plague: The Inside Story of How Citizens and Science Tamed AIDS | France, David | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle. How to Survive a Plague: The Inside Story of How Citizens and Science Tamed AIDS (English Edition) eBook: France, David: audiovisualsgr-mgf.eu: Kindle-Shop. AIDS – Kampf ums Leben (Originaltitel: How to Survive a Plague) ist ein Dokumentarfilm aus dem Jahr über die Anfangszeit des HI-Virus und die. to Survive a Plague Programm von David France Border Lines. New York, Sechs Jahre sind seid dem Ausbruch der ersten AIDS-Erkrankungen​. How to Survive a Plague is the story of two grassroots coalitions — ACT UP and Treatment Action Group — made up of innovative activists, many of them. In seinem Film „How to Survive a Plague“ greift der Regisseur David France auf Archivaufnahmen der Aktivisten zurück und entwirft anhand der faszinierenden.

    How To Survive A Plague

    How to Survive a Plague book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The definitive history of the successful battle to halt th. to Survive a Plague Programm von David France Border Lines. New York, Sechs Jahre sind seid dem Ausbruch der ersten AIDS-Erkrankungen​. Die Dokumentation zeigt die Geschichte der Aids-Epidemie in den USA in den 80er und 90er Jahren. Außerdem wird der dramatische Kampf, den die Organisation `Act Up' für eine Neuausrichtung der US-amerikanischen Aids-Politik führte, beleuchtet. Eine harte Konkurrenz. Teilen Sie Ihre Meinung mit. Tickets für die Zeremonie haben sie nicht. Jetzt drängeln sie sich, ihm die Hand zu schütteln. Dann werden Sie bei bücher. A riveting, powerful telling of the Dennis Gansel of the grassroots movement of activists, many of them in a life-or-death struggle, who seized upon scientific research to help develop the drugs that turned HIV from a mostly fatal infection to a manageable disease. More Details Persönlich haftender Gesellschafter: buecher. We Kif Dresden as these activists learn to become their own researchers, lobbyists, drug smugglers, and clinicians, establishing their own newspapers, research journals, and laboratories, and as they go on to force reform in the nation s disease-fighting Schwinkendorf. Doch nachdem es für seine Filmpartnerin Emmanuelle Riva 1218 hat, steht der französische Schauspieler als Jens Schäfer da.

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    The amazing array of characters will infuriate you, make you laugh and break your heart. Read this book to see how every day citizens of this country brought about l This is an extraordinary book, beautifully written.

    Read this book to see how every day citizens of this country brought about lifesaving changes to slow and somewhat manage the AIDS crisis. Millions of people are alive today because of what they accomplished.

    France shows how terrifying and isolating an experience it must have been to grow up gay in America during the 70s and 80s.

    Using his own experience he illustrates the terror and stigma surrounding homosexuality and this was before the appearance of AIDS.

    Initially it chose not to list the partners of deceased victims of AIDS. They had a situation where not only were all the major news outlets largely ignoring it or mis-reporting the facts and the mayor refusing to discuss it, but you also had most hospitals initially refused to give patients a bed or room, where most doctors refused to treat them and ambulance drivers were refusing to pick up AIDS patients, and almost every undertakers refused to accept the bodies.

    Quarantine orders from the CDC for any foreign homosexual attempting to enter the country, they were questioned in special detention centres, where if they admitted to being gay they could be deported.

    I looked away. Even though some 34 million tuned in to watch, the network lost an estimated half a million dollars in advertising revenue as corporations fled the time slot.

    Having the likes of William F. It got so bad that at one stage you had thousands of tax paying Americans having to pay for their own flights to Paris, France in a desperate bid to try and access superior drugs.

    Church leaders made it clear that if forced to hire gays they would shut down the whole operation, leaving tens of thousands of at risk New Yorkers in a lurch.

    This book could maybe have been more stringently edited, there are certainly times when France loses his way a bit, getting bogged down in the minutiae, which it fully understandable since this was a deeply personal account that explored the lives and suffering of many of his close friends and many people he loved.

    But more importantly what France has done here is raise awareness and really tried to push it into the mainstream.

    He shames the America, which loves to show to the world how free, democratic and tolerant it is. He consistently destroys this myth clearly demonstrating that it was far removed from this idea it loves to portray itself as.

    France shows us that for well over a decade Big Pharma, senior religious figures, the vast majority of the mainstream media, president Reagan, Bush Snr and almost every senior person they appointed, greatly failed millions and as result of their deliberate avoidance, personal agendas and not least their ignorant, cowardly, homophobic propaganda, caused or led to the unnecessary suffering and deaths of millions and all because of their sexual orientation.

    This is a significant book that draws attention to one of the darkest chapters in modern American history and shames them for their shallow prejudices and shameless ignorance and for that alone France should be applauded.

    An enthralling history that does justice to one of the most revolutionary, unlikely, under-appreciated movements in recent American life.

    David France is a tender, authoritative guide through the cr An enthralling history that does justice to one of the most revolutionary, unlikely, under-appreciated movements in recent American life.

    David France is a tender, authoritative guide through the crisis. As a gay reporter in NYC for the duration of the crisis, France was in the thick of everything and draws extensively from his contemporaneous recordings and notes.

    He captures the personalities, unravels the factions, and distills the senses of urgency and dread that permeated the times.

    He also chooses to share his own stories, loves, and losses in the text, weaving them into the larger fabric of the crisis. France chronicles the renaissance of brilliant direct action activism that eventually pressured the US government under Reagan!

    It was a shockingly democratic, leaderless movement brimming with creativity, collaboration, and strife.

    I am so deeply moved by this history. While this review so far reads as a breathless celebration of ACT UP and their radical world-building, no reader should approach this book lightly.

    There were passages that left me inconsolable. The story of the AIDS crisis, while in some dimensions the remarkable story of a resilient people fighting against all odds, is by most dimensions nothing more than the story of incalculable loss.

    Gay men were hit particularly hard; estimates suggest that more than 1 in 10 gay American men died in the AIDS crisis, with the local percentage rising to be much higher within major cities.

    Many of those men died alone. Many had no one to collect their bodies. While reading, and after, I wept for them. France gives readers an appreciation of this horrific statistical scale, but the text is also filled with dozens of individual deaths, each honored and told in detailed tenderness — even when there was no tenderness in death.

    These acts of remembering are sacred. The book is filled with mourning. I am really overwhelmed by this read. In a constructive way. I am so deeply grateful for the queer people who came before me, who fought to save my life and make this world possible for me just as much as for themselves.

    I am stricken with grief and made aware of the chasm that precedes me. And hereon I will remember.

    AIDS was supposed to be the next pandemic, A disease that would take out 1 in 4 of the population. So far this virus has claimed around 40 million victims and it is thought that there are around 37 million still carrying the HIV or full blown AIDS virus at present.

    These are huge numbers. It was passed from individual to individual through sexual contact and once it had entered into the gay community it spread rapidly AIDS was supposed to be the next pandemic, A disease that would take out 1 in 4 of the population.

    It was passed from individual to individual through sexual contact and once it had entered into the gay community it spread rapidly.

    No one knew how to treat the symptoms or even if it was curable. This was even before men started to start to succumb to this unknown illness, initially thought to be some form of cancer, which was fast becoming an epidemic.

    It was a huge struggle for the gay community to even gain acceptance a lot of the time, this unknown virus was seen by some to be some sort of punishment.

    The problem was that this virus was decimating people. This book is not the easiest to read, it is very dense, long and incredibly detailed.

    He lost partners and many close friends and associates to the virus and this made him do what he could do best, write.

    He describes the pretty despicable action by the American team of scientists undertaking research after the French team at the Institut Pasteur discovered the HIV-1 virus, and how Burroughs Wellcome developed AZT; supposedly the drug that would help those suffering.

    They made a fortune and still, people died. In their thousands. Thankfully modern drugs mean that the disease is manageable, but this book is a reminder of a time that should not be forgotten.

    I've just finished this and I'm sat here feeling a lot of things; I'm not sure how to describe this book but I will try anyway. Mostly I feel a bone-deep exhaustion at this fucking repetitive story: people are dead and dying because they are not considered people by other people.

    It's as frustratingly simple as that and it's the same thing every single time. Then I feel anger. Anger not only that it took 11 godforsaken years for s I've just finished this and I'm sat here feeling a lot of things; I'm not sure how to describe this book but I will try anyway.

    Anger not only that it took 11 godforsaken years for something to be done; but also anger that I was never told, by anybody anywhere that that is how long it took.

    I've been thinking a lot recently about queer history and how it is passed down. This book hammered home once again that there is a gaping void amongst younger queers' knowledge where the AIDS crisis ought to be; and with it the gaping void of communication between generations.

    Our history and culture often isn't passed down by our parents, our family, or our immediate surroundings.

    We cannot absorb it passively because it often isn't there until we are young adults. AIDS caused a generational trauma that none of us know how to navigate because we have barely anything or anyone to reach back to.

    I don't know what to do about it, but I certainly will not forget the little bit of history i have just read in this book.

    Sep 14, Christine Queen of Books rated it it was amazing Shelves: nonfiction , lgbtq , highly-recommend , standouts.

    The author David France is an investigative journalist, which means the book provides a well-written and well-researched account. The author also is a gay man who moved to NYC in To be clear, this book is nonfiction - in pages, maybe 30 read like a memoir.

    But still - the author was there. He didn't just consult the archives and conduct tl;dr - Read this one. He didn't just consult the archives and conduct interviews.

    He lived so much of what is detailed in these pages. I learned a ton. I felt angry and depressed, and hopeful. I was reminded how the public - and the medical community - reacted in the s.

    I was wowed by how much grassroots activism and education were conducted, and how their efforts truly saved lives. All in all: five stars. Jun 14, Ana rated it really liked it Shelves: booklist , kindle-scribd-library , lgbtqia , nonfiction , read-in Dec 01, Kathleen rated it it was amazing.

    Everybody knows that the size of a book does not guarantee its quality, yet there's still something thrilling about a book of a certain heft; a door-stopper-size tome speaks silently to a certain degree of ambition, completeness and necessity.

    Its pages are packed with scientific, medical and social history, offering the reader a simultaneously intimate and sweeping understanding of the crisis from its earliest onset through the mids, when "the number of commercially available protease inhibitors" gave patients life-saving options, and beyond to the era in which survivor's guilt troubled many of the movement's former activists.

    His award-winning documentary film of the same name was released in Here as there, France's skills as an investigative reporter are on impressive display.

    The notes alone take up 79 pages. Early on, he reminds the reader that the global AIDS pandemic has entered its fourth decade, and that by the early s, "the body count was as high as forty million, which is nearly twice the devastation of the bubonic plague.

    Sixteen pages of glossy inserts present poignant photographs of activists, teams of scientists, panels from the AIDS memorial quilt, and reproductions of posters and pages from plague journals kept by those living — and dying — in the epidemic.

    He opens the first chapter with his own arrival in as a young gay man in New York City, "for an internship at the United Nations and a chance to explore Christopher Street, the mountaintop of gay life," followed by his permanent move to Manhattan in June His timing, as he notes, was less than fortuitous.

    For "just two weeks after unpacking, on the Friday of the long July 4 weekend, The New York Times carried the first news of the plague.

    In rich detail and with a fine texture that benefits from his insider position, France charts the disease's spread as well as the heroic and flawed human efforts to contain it.

    Grippingly narrative and action-packed, the book astutely characterizes such key figures as Dr.

    Joe Sonnabend, one of the first doctors to sound the alarm when he noticed the shockingly high incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma in gay men, and the controversial author Larry Kramer, who "found the sexual Olympics" in the gay community "unnerving" and "was Jane Austen in Erica Jong's world," but who was one of the first to act, writing in the New York Native, that "In the past, we have often been a divided community; I hope we can all get together on this emergency, undivided, cohesively, and with all the numbers we in so many ways possess.

    Dec 11, Mark Hiser rated it it was amazing Shelves: activism , history-current-events , bio-autobio-autobio-novel , lgbtq , politics , health-sexuality-etc , diversity-social-justice.

    Last evening, the President of the United States issued a proclamation in commemoration of those who have died, and are living with, one of the worst plagues of modern history.

    Though other events later occurred to bring about more equality, many historians consider the Stonewall Inn riots of to be the start of the modern gay rights movement.

    While the book focuses on the LGBT community, it ultimately is about how a group of people refused to die in silence and, in their refusal, changed the world in which we all live.

    It is haunting non-fiction book also a film rich in details of what is best and worst in politicians, scientists, journalists, friends and family, and people on the street.

    It is a narrative of problem-solving, luck, perseverance, community, anger, hope, and love. It also brings to light human compassion, hatred, silence, action, desperation, indifference, competition, and greed.

    How to Survive a Plague is study of how the collective history of oppression of LGBTQ persons has shaped that community and caused it to loudly proclaim it will not go back into hiding and, while the book saddens and angers the reader, it also celebrates a community called to creativity, tenacity, love, and action.

    View 1 comment. Jan 29, Michael H. This is an astonishing book. Including the glossary and notes, it tops pages.

    I am not a fast reader, and I read it in a week. I should say at the outset that I had a personal interest in the material, having lost a partner to AIDS in Boston in and many friends in the subsequent years.

    This book has frequently been compared to Randy Shilts' "And the Band Played On" but is more tightly focussed on the formation of ACT UP and its impact on the ultimate development of life-saving drugs.

    De This is an astonishing book. Despite a staggering amount of detail, I was never bored and rarely confused, a testament to Mr. France's meticulous presentation of material.

    While it often reads as a chronicle of failures, both by government officials and pharmaceutical companies, the author never lets the reader move away from a connection to real people doing deeply committed work under the worst possible circumstances.

    I cared about them personally and ached for their suffering as year after year passed with only AZT, a drug toxic for most patients and with terrible side effects, to turn to.

    I hope that there is a special place in Hell for Burroughs-Wellcome executives, Ronald Reagan, Archbishop John O'Conner and Senator Jesse Helms, people who intentionally held back progress on finding a cure for AIDS for their own financial benefit or out of some perverted religious belief.

    I bought a copy of the documentary of the same name last year and was deeply moved. There is a visceral difference between reading about Peter Staley scaling the entrance to buildings at the FDA and the NIH and seeing a video taken of the event.

    I watched the dvd again after finishing the book and felt devastated all over again. Reading the book had deepened my understanding of what happened and my love for the people involved, and seeing them on film, so many of whom died, broke my heart.

    It's worth having your heart broken to read this book. Dec 19, Sarah Rosenberger rated it really liked it Shelves: audiobook , history , lgbtq , cultural-studies , science.

    By the time I was old enough to really understand what AIDS was, the YM magazines I read were already full of articles about pretty blonde girls living with the disease, detailed info about condom use, and the oft-repeated reminder that, "anyone can get AIDS.

    This book brings into stark relief the hardships endured by those touched by AIDS during the disease's first decade.

    France refers to AIDS as a plague, and while that might seem a bit melodramatic at first, after several hundred pages of deaths and suffering, that wording becomes undeniable.

    France humanizes the crisis by including both his own experiences as a gay man living in New York during the height of the epidemic, and those of the scientists, activists, politicians, and journalists working on AIDS, whose personalities are clearly shown, warts and all.

    The last half of the the book started to get a bit bogged down by the huge cast of chemicals and characters, and by France's verbatim transcripts of ACT UP meetings and the petty squabbles between rival groups, but I suppose there's no way to avoid that.

    Growing up in the 80s I really had no awareness of the spread of Aids in America. It was only during my teenage years in the 90s when I came out and befriended other gay people that I became more knowledgeable about the virus.

    With an estimated 35 million people having died from Aids and another 37 million people currently living with it, this is something which affects everyone but particularly people in the gay community.

    Jul 03, Mrs. Danvers rated it really liked it Shelves: medical-narrative , nonfiction , wellcome-prize-nominee. It seems so long ago now but sometimes it seems like yesterday.

    I'm grateful for this inside perspective on the fight to get "drugs into bodies. May 04, Edward Rathke rated it it was amazing. This history of the AIDS epidemic, which is also parts memoir and biography, is fascinating for a number of reasons.

    One of them is that none of these people who drove AIDS research forward are generally remembered. I, at least, was not familiar with any of them, excepting Dr Fauci.

    It's interesting to read this during a pandemic where Dr Fauci also stands at the head of leadership. During the current crisis, he's seen as a hero trying to save the lives of millions, but during the AIDS epidemic, This history of the AIDS epidemic, which is also parts memoir and biography, is fascinating for a number of reasons.

    During the current crisis, he's seen as a hero trying to save the lives of millions, but during the AIDS epidemic, as described here, he's sort of a smiling villain, along with Reagan and George HW Bush.

    It's a strange but somewhat fitting contrast, I think, for a public official. Yesterday's villains can become today's heroes. Too, in light of what I've read here, I wonder how much he's actually responsible for the US' abysmal response to Covid I don't typically like my histories to meld and slosh around with memoir, but France manages it in such a way that it feels not only natural but integral to the broader history.

    This history is really about young gay men dying by the thousands and fighting for the lives of those they hoped would live past their death.

    Because this tragedy played out in real time, in front of a nation that tried to ignore it, it seems fitting that the broader history be so directly tied to gay culture in New York, of which France was a notable member.

    What's most fascinating about this book, though, is learning how those dying of AIDS changed the way research was done and drugs were approved by the FDA.

    Not just non-scientists, but actual patients being driving and directing forces in the process and nature of treatment development for the disease they were dying from.

    It's astonishing, really, especially given what I thought I knew about the scientific research method. But, yes, a big powerful book of unlikely heroes who had to die by the tens of thousands before anyone with power took the necessary steps to save their lives.

    Aug 26, George Fenwick rated it it was amazing. Sep 08, Saige rated it it was amazing. I'm not crying, you're crying. This book is beautiful, sad, and somehow still incredibly relevant decades after the peak of the AIDS epidemic.

    I loved how it celebrated the accomplishments of leaders in the gay community while also admitting that they were often wrong and frustratingly human.

    Kramer, for example, was both an amazing leader and an incredibly petty man who took his frustrations out on the people around him.

    Very well-written, researched, and with a powerful personal touch, this bo I'm not crying, you're crying. Very well-written, researched, and with a powerful personal touch, this book is an amazing one for anyone curious about the history of AIDS in America.

    I heard an interview that David France did on the Nov. It was an interesting interview, and ultimately one that motivated me to pick up the book.

    France interweaves his personal narrative with the political and medical transgressions of the AIDS epidemic. I found the buyers clubs and the underground drug market particularly fascinating even when the drugs DIDN'T work, there was no evidence of the drugs working, people knew they didn't work, I heard an interview that David France did on the Nov.

    I found the buyers clubs and the underground drug market particularly fascinating even when the drugs DIDN'T work, there was no evidence of the drugs working, people knew they didn't work, but yet were sustained through these underground drug networks.

    The "what the hell" drugs, and the suicide accounts perfectly exemplified the desperation and hopelessness that many experienced at the time between and As a result of the epidemic, you can see the loose ties to the deregulation of big pharma.

    At one time it would take a drug as long as 7 years to gain approval for distribution. During the AIDS epidemic time was of the essence and it was rare for one to live with AIDS for 7 years, when the given life expectancy was roughly 18 to 22 months at that time.

    So it was important to get drug trials underway and get drugs approved. It raises the question of patient freedom in their own treatment and what they want to take.

    This was actually an interesting shift in the book, where the fight and purpose of ACT UP started as getting drugs into bodies, and then once a relationship was built with the NIH and drug manufacturers, the shift was "well, is the goal to put drugs into bodies OR is it to prolong the lives of those living with AIDS?

    I'm not entirely convinced that one would need to read both books, as they are similar in message. I've read both, and both are good.

    Though I would not suggest reading them back-to-back as the information would get redundant. Once Crixivan was proven at thwart HIV, the glimpse into the survivor's remorse was interesting.

    To follow the lives of the activists who had lost so many friends and loved ones. Some turned to drugs others didn't really know how to adjust to a life without fear.

    Nov 12, Frederico rated it it was amazing. This is probably one of the most important books I've read in my life. That period also marks one the lowest points in not only the fight against AIDS but also of rabid homophobia in the West.

    Homosexuals were viewed then as not only perverted, but also as plagued and lethally contagious. The disease had by This is probably one of the most important books I've read in my life.

    The disease had by then killed about twenty thousand people in the US alone, mostly gay men. AIDS was the "gay cancer. We said, "entendidos", the "in-the-knows.

    Indeed I got tested, as if I survived the plague, never contracted HIV, but I kept several doors closed in my life as a result.

    This book is chronological, describing every step of the fight of gay men in the US to pressure government and scientific institutions, which were, to say the least, reluctant to fight the disease.

    Damn Ronald Reagan. The cost to human lives is one of the great tragedies of the XX centuries, based in the number of lives that could have been saved was there the will to stop it - and not only the lives of homosexuals, of course.

    As I read this book, I constantly pictured myself where I was in my life when each of the major events in the fight took place, up until the end of the book in , when I moved to NYC and fully entered a gay community that had publicly existed since the Stonewall riots in AIDS became a non-issue almost overnight.

    But gays were most definitely out of the closet! Now I'm married, my husband and I have two kids, we live unfortunately exclusively among heterosexual international families in a gated compound in China.

    Everyone is pretty friendly towards us. I make it a point to explain my 9-year-old twins about gays, prejudice, Stonewall, drag queens we watch RuPaul's Drag Race together.

    Certainly they get a lot of flack at school because "they have no mom. I just read on the news today that Pete Buttigieg is leading the democratic polls in Iowa.

    View 2 comments. Feb 14, David rated it it was amazing. Strongly recommended: If you did not live through the plague years, be sure to read this.

    Even if you did live through them there's a lot to learn from this book. I knew I wanted to read this, but also feared it would be too painful to go over this history.

    I had seen the film of course there have been "novelizations" of films in the past, but wonder if this is the first time a movie paved the way for a non-fiction book?

    I knew the author to be a good writer, as well as a witness to the event Strongly recommended: If you did not live through the plague years, be sure to read this.

    I knew the author to be a good writer, as well as a witness to the events. Although the book describes a terrible time that I remember too well, it is so well told that I could not help admiring the author even more than I already did.

    For too long, most Americans were unaware while my community was fighting for its life; worse yet, those in power were hostile to our survival.

    This book tells the story of how we survived, as well as documenting the terrible toll of loss. Eliminate possible nesting places for rodents in and around your home.

    Tool sheds, brush piles, basements, garages and attics should all be checked for signs of infestation. If you happen to find rodent excrement, remove it quickly and carefully, as the plague bacteria can survive and be passed on through contact with infected feces.

    Always wear gloves and some type of breathing protection a medical mask or tied handkerchief when cleaning rat droppings to prevent contracted the disease yourself.

    Avoid contact with sick or dead animals. After an animal has died, the Yersinia bacteria can remain active in its tissues or in fleas that it carries.

    Stay away from animals that have become ill or succumbed to plague symptoms. Plague may spread from diseased tissues or fluids to a living host.

    Their technicians are equipped with protective gear and can remove potentially infected carcasses with minimal health risk. Use flea repellent when spending time outside.

    Wear a repellent spray or rub containing DEET if you plan on spending a lot of time outside. One of the most common means of plague transmission is through the bites of fleas that burrow into the fur of rodents and feed on infected blood.

    DEET and other repellents will keep fleas away, and keep you safe. DEET repellent sprays are safe to use directly on the skin and pose no threat of environmental harm.

    Bathe thoroughly and regularly. Plague bacteria can enter through the delicate tissues of the mouth, nose and eyes. Practice good basic hygiene habits and be aware of risk factors in your environment.

    The disease spreads easily to sensitive tissues, and you never know when you might have touched something carrying traces of the bacteria. Part 2 of Acquire medication to stop the disease.

    In some cases, medication can be prescribed to people whom pathologists have reason to believe may have been exposed to plague.

    These drugs bind to and eradicate Yersinia bacteria in the bloodstream before it has a chance to multiply. If you believe you or someone you know might be at risk of contracting the disease, talk to a doctor about your options.

    It is uncertain if or when a new vaccine will be formulated. Seek immediate medical attention. Once an individual has been infected, the only course of action is to treat the disease with powerful antibiotics.

    Most hospitals keep these antibiotics on hand in case of epidemic emergencies. Young children, the old and infirm are at the greatest risk.

    Plague infects the blood as it spreads through the bloodstream, attacks lymphatic sites and can eventually lead to toxic shock and necrosis of tissues.

    Isolate infected parties. For the safety of those around them, people who have caught the plague need to be safely isolated until they receive treatment.

    The CDC has offices all over the United States and can dispatch personnel to collect and treat the infected party.

    Keep a distance of at least 3 feet from anyone who may be infected with an airborne form of the plague. Part 3 of Know if your location has had instances of the plague before.

    Breakouts of the plague are more prevalent in rural areas that are overpopulated. These areas typically tend to have poor sanitation and more rodents.

    Most frequently, the plague affects areas in Africa. Know if your occupation puts you at risk for the plague. Veterinarians and their assistants, who come in contact with animals on a daily basis, are more likely to contract the plague.

    People who work outdoors are also more prone to becoming infected. See if your hobbies put you at risk for the plague. Outdoor activities like camping put people more at risk for developing the plague.

    Be especially cautious if you are in an area you know has been infected by the plague. Take extra precautions not to be bitten by animals or bugs.

    But also, remember that there are only 5, cases of the plague worldwide each year. Be aware of the symptoms. Plague may not manifest any symptoms for several days.

    Within a week, the infected will start to exhibit flu-like symptoms, including chills, fever, cold sweats and nausea and vomiting.

    As the disease progresses, the lymph nodes become swollen and tender as the body attempts to fight off infection. Advanced stages of plague can cause sepsis, or blood toxicity, decomposition of bodily tissues and eventually death.

    It is extremely important to stay informed of possible plague outbreaks in your area. As many as 8 cases of plague were reported in major California cities between and —it is not solely a Third World disease.

    Because Yersinia Pestis is most often spread through animal interaction, it is advisable not to allow household pets to sleep in your bed, especially if you live in a wooded area or a region where plague has been identified.

    Your pet may have had physical contact with another infected animal, or may be host to fleas that can bite and transmit the disease to humans.

    It is also recommended that pet owners use medicines and oil repellents to treat household animals for these bugs. Wear protection when working with animals.

    Veterinarians, pest control specialists and people of other professions where contact with living and dead animals is common, such as game hunters, should wear hand, eye and breathing protection when handling animals that might carry the disease.

    Get tested for plague if you travel frequently. In impoverished and less developed parts of the world, plague outbreaks occur with unfortunate frequency.

    All it takes is one unaware person to become Patient Zero in a lethal outbreak. Frequent travelers should undergo a battery of tests to screen for dangerous and communicable diseases before and after all journeys to at-risk areas.

    Yes, the plague is very deadly. As stated in the article, you could think it is a common cold, so around the time you seek medical help, it could be too late, and the most likely outcome would be for you to die.

    Not Helpful 11 Helpful 6. Plague is a bacterial disease, which means that antibiotics are effective in stopping it.

    How to Survive a Plague book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The definitive history of the successful battle to halt th. Winner of The Green Carnation Prize for LGBTQ literature Winner of the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT non-fiction Shortlisted for the Wellcome Book Prize. Aidskranke, mal nicht als Opfer: Die gefeierte Doku "How to Survive a Plague" erzählt die Geschichte der Protestgruppe Act Up. Mit schrillen. How to Survive a Plague by David France is the riveting, powerful and profoundly moving story of the AIDS epidemic and the grass-roots.

    How To Survive A Plague - Inhaltsverzeichnis

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    An insider's comprehensive and eye opening account of the citizens who changed and saved lives throughout the AIDS plague.

    How to Survive a Plague is informative, emotional, and unique. Not only was I in awe of the people who repeatedly worked to change the course of history, but the author's clear dedication was inspiring.

    Everyone should read this book, now more than ever. If ever protest feels like a hopeless task, this book is proof that it isn't.

    Ignored by the majority - confronted with ha An insider's comprehensive and eye opening account of the citizens who changed and saved lives throughout the AIDS plague.

    Ignored by the majority - confronted with hate - millions of people are now alive because of the people and founding groups that never quit, even when many would and many did.

    David France does a stunning job of accurately sharing what it took. This book is an amazing accomplishment and I urge everyone to read it.

    Feb 03, Silvio rated it it was amazing Shelves: books-about-new-york. Unlike Shilts, who maintained a strictly detached, if dramatic, journalistic tone as he related the story like a mystery novel whose outcome, in , we were not quite as assured of, France was there in the thick of it and he periodically positions himself among the characters he is following.

    This does not detract from his well-researched and more or less dispassionate narrative, but it does serve to put you down right in the geography of the Village in NYC or the campus of NIH in the DC area.

    This is helpful because there are so many characters, and these mostly gay men worked so tirelessly as political activists, public health advocates, and support for their dying loved ones that it would all seem unreal if the author were not reminding us from time to time that he was there and he saw it happen.

    There were also women who played a significant role and he gives them their due, but most likely someone else will come along to tell their side of it in depth at some point.

    One interesting element for me was the fact that the musician and political architect of the "safer-sex" movement, Michael Callen, is one of the main characters of this story.

    Any gay person in the s who attended rallies and fundraisers, even in the Washington DC area rather than Callen's home base, New York City, would know him first and foremost as the amazing voice in the gay a capella doo wop group, The Flirtations, as well as as a solo songwriter of stunningly iconic songs of gay liberation, such as "How to Have Sex in an Epidemic without getting caught up in polemic, " as well as "Love Don't Need a Reason," and the unforgettable, "Living in Wartime," all featured on his first solo album, Purple Heart.

    The book does not focus on his music much at all. Rather, it follows his efforts to convince gay men at the start of the epidemic to refrain from unsafe practices.

    Initially, he thinks this means celibacy. Then he has his inspiration with the help of his battle brother, Richard Berkowitz : certain sexual practices are safe; others are not.

    Due to their efforts, the condom became the primary weapon against HIV, and their influence helped gay men "put the love back into sex," as they put it.

    Aside from the interesting personalities, my lasting takeaway from reading France's book is to realize how these men and women drove themselves, ran themselves ragged, while simultaneously dealing with severe illness, grief over lost partners, and economic hardship endured mostly without a security net.

    Like the Ancient Greeks I believe , who are said to have gone to battle in pairs with their same-sex lovers to incite them to protect each other fiercely, the same ethic appears to apply to this account of the early soldiers who battled a White House administration who ignored the epidemic, a New York mayor too concerned with his own image to provide leadership, and the greater apathy of society who were not terribly bothered about AIDS until it felled Rock Hudson, a perceived "straight white male" like them.

    If you were an adult during the 80s and 90s, this book will remind you where you were while all this was happening, and you will most likely be affected by this heroic a word often overused, but apt in this case effort which did, ultimately achieve the goal of making effective drugs available against the "plague" of HIV.

    Mar 07, Tim Pinckney rated it it was amazing. This is an extraordinary book, beautifully written. It will knock the wind out of you at times I was finishing it over lunch yesterday and started crying in Chipotle For those of us that experienced much of this story first hand, it is a detailed, smart and completely readable account of a harrowing time in our recent history.

    The amazing array of characters will infuriate you, make you laugh and break your heart. Read this book to see how every day citizens of this country brought about l This is an extraordinary book, beautifully written.

    Read this book to see how every day citizens of this country brought about lifesaving changes to slow and somewhat manage the AIDS crisis. Millions of people are alive today because of what they accomplished.

    France shows how terrifying and isolating an experience it must have been to grow up gay in America during the 70s and 80s.

    Using his own experience he illustrates the terror and stigma surrounding homosexuality and this was before the appearance of AIDS. Initially it chose not to list the partners of deceased victims of AIDS.

    They had a situation where not only were all the major news outlets largely ignoring it or mis-reporting the facts and the mayor refusing to discuss it, but you also had most hospitals initially refused to give patients a bed or room, where most doctors refused to treat them and ambulance drivers were refusing to pick up AIDS patients, and almost every undertakers refused to accept the bodies.

    Quarantine orders from the CDC for any foreign homosexual attempting to enter the country, they were questioned in special detention centres, where if they admitted to being gay they could be deported.

    I looked away. Even though some 34 million tuned in to watch, the network lost an estimated half a million dollars in advertising revenue as corporations fled the time slot.

    Having the likes of William F. It got so bad that at one stage you had thousands of tax paying Americans having to pay for their own flights to Paris, France in a desperate bid to try and access superior drugs.

    Church leaders made it clear that if forced to hire gays they would shut down the whole operation, leaving tens of thousands of at risk New Yorkers in a lurch.

    This book could maybe have been more stringently edited, there are certainly times when France loses his way a bit, getting bogged down in the minutiae, which it fully understandable since this was a deeply personal account that explored the lives and suffering of many of his close friends and many people he loved.

    But more importantly what France has done here is raise awareness and really tried to push it into the mainstream. He shames the America, which loves to show to the world how free, democratic and tolerant it is.

    He consistently destroys this myth clearly demonstrating that it was far removed from this idea it loves to portray itself as. France shows us that for well over a decade Big Pharma, senior religious figures, the vast majority of the mainstream media, president Reagan, Bush Snr and almost every senior person they appointed, greatly failed millions and as result of their deliberate avoidance, personal agendas and not least their ignorant, cowardly, homophobic propaganda, caused or led to the unnecessary suffering and deaths of millions and all because of their sexual orientation.

    This is a significant book that draws attention to one of the darkest chapters in modern American history and shames them for their shallow prejudices and shameless ignorance and for that alone France should be applauded.

    An enthralling history that does justice to one of the most revolutionary, unlikely, under-appreciated movements in recent American life.

    David France is a tender, authoritative guide through the cr An enthralling history that does justice to one of the most revolutionary, unlikely, under-appreciated movements in recent American life.

    David France is a tender, authoritative guide through the crisis. As a gay reporter in NYC for the duration of the crisis, France was in the thick of everything and draws extensively from his contemporaneous recordings and notes.

    He captures the personalities, unravels the factions, and distills the senses of urgency and dread that permeated the times.

    He also chooses to share his own stories, loves, and losses in the text, weaving them into the larger fabric of the crisis.

    France chronicles the renaissance of brilliant direct action activism that eventually pressured the US government under Reagan!

    It was a shockingly democratic, leaderless movement brimming with creativity, collaboration, and strife. I am so deeply moved by this history.

    While this review so far reads as a breathless celebration of ACT UP and their radical world-building, no reader should approach this book lightly.

    There were passages that left me inconsolable. The story of the AIDS crisis, while in some dimensions the remarkable story of a resilient people fighting against all odds, is by most dimensions nothing more than the story of incalculable loss.

    Gay men were hit particularly hard; estimates suggest that more than 1 in 10 gay American men died in the AIDS crisis, with the local percentage rising to be much higher within major cities.

    Many of those men died alone. Many had no one to collect their bodies. While reading, and after, I wept for them.

    France gives readers an appreciation of this horrific statistical scale, but the text is also filled with dozens of individual deaths, each honored and told in detailed tenderness — even when there was no tenderness in death.

    These acts of remembering are sacred. The book is filled with mourning. I am really overwhelmed by this read. In a constructive way. I am so deeply grateful for the queer people who came before me, who fought to save my life and make this world possible for me just as much as for themselves.

    I am stricken with grief and made aware of the chasm that precedes me. And hereon I will remember. AIDS was supposed to be the next pandemic, A disease that would take out 1 in 4 of the population.

    So far this virus has claimed around 40 million victims and it is thought that there are around 37 million still carrying the HIV or full blown AIDS virus at present.

    These are huge numbers. It was passed from individual to individual through sexual contact and once it had entered into the gay community it spread rapidly AIDS was supposed to be the next pandemic, A disease that would take out 1 in 4 of the population.

    It was passed from individual to individual through sexual contact and once it had entered into the gay community it spread rapidly. No one knew how to treat the symptoms or even if it was curable.

    This was even before men started to start to succumb to this unknown illness, initially thought to be some form of cancer, which was fast becoming an epidemic.

    It was a huge struggle for the gay community to even gain acceptance a lot of the time, this unknown virus was seen by some to be some sort of punishment.

    The problem was that this virus was decimating people. This book is not the easiest to read, it is very dense, long and incredibly detailed.

    He lost partners and many close friends and associates to the virus and this made him do what he could do best, write. He describes the pretty despicable action by the American team of scientists undertaking research after the French team at the Institut Pasteur discovered the HIV-1 virus, and how Burroughs Wellcome developed AZT; supposedly the drug that would help those suffering.

    They made a fortune and still, people died. In their thousands. Thankfully modern drugs mean that the disease is manageable, but this book is a reminder of a time that should not be forgotten.

    I've just finished this and I'm sat here feeling a lot of things; I'm not sure how to describe this book but I will try anyway. Mostly I feel a bone-deep exhaustion at this fucking repetitive story: people are dead and dying because they are not considered people by other people.

    It's as frustratingly simple as that and it's the same thing every single time. Then I feel anger.

    Anger not only that it took 11 godforsaken years for s I've just finished this and I'm sat here feeling a lot of things; I'm not sure how to describe this book but I will try anyway.

    Anger not only that it took 11 godforsaken years for something to be done; but also anger that I was never told, by anybody anywhere that that is how long it took.

    I've been thinking a lot recently about queer history and how it is passed down. This book hammered home once again that there is a gaping void amongst younger queers' knowledge where the AIDS crisis ought to be; and with it the gaping void of communication between generations.

    Our history and culture often isn't passed down by our parents, our family, or our immediate surroundings.

    We cannot absorb it passively because it often isn't there until we are young adults. AIDS caused a generational trauma that none of us know how to navigate because we have barely anything or anyone to reach back to.

    I don't know what to do about it, but I certainly will not forget the little bit of history i have just read in this book.

    Sep 14, Christine Queen of Books rated it it was amazing Shelves: nonfiction , lgbtq , highly-recommend , standouts.

    The author David France is an investigative journalist, which means the book provides a well-written and well-researched account. The author also is a gay man who moved to NYC in To be clear, this book is nonfiction - in pages, maybe 30 read like a memoir.

    But still - the author was there. He didn't just consult the archives and conduct tl;dr - Read this one. He didn't just consult the archives and conduct interviews.

    He lived so much of what is detailed in these pages. I learned a ton. I felt angry and depressed, and hopeful. I was reminded how the public - and the medical community - reacted in the s.

    I was wowed by how much grassroots activism and education were conducted, and how their efforts truly saved lives.

    All in all: five stars. Jun 14, Ana rated it really liked it Shelves: booklist , kindle-scribd-library , lgbtqia , nonfiction , read-in Dec 01, Kathleen rated it it was amazing.

    Everybody knows that the size of a book does not guarantee its quality, yet there's still something thrilling about a book of a certain heft; a door-stopper-size tome speaks silently to a certain degree of ambition, completeness and necessity.

    Its pages are packed with scientific, medical and social history, offering the reader a simultaneously intimate and sweeping understanding of the crisis from its earliest onset through the mids, when "the number of commercially available protease inhibitors" gave patients life-saving options, and beyond to the era in which survivor's guilt troubled many of the movement's former activists.

    His award-winning documentary film of the same name was released in Here as there, France's skills as an investigative reporter are on impressive display.

    The notes alone take up 79 pages. Early on, he reminds the reader that the global AIDS pandemic has entered its fourth decade, and that by the early s, "the body count was as high as forty million, which is nearly twice the devastation of the bubonic plague.

    Sixteen pages of glossy inserts present poignant photographs of activists, teams of scientists, panels from the AIDS memorial quilt, and reproductions of posters and pages from plague journals kept by those living — and dying — in the epidemic.

    He opens the first chapter with his own arrival in as a young gay man in New York City, "for an internship at the United Nations and a chance to explore Christopher Street, the mountaintop of gay life," followed by his permanent move to Manhattan in June His timing, as he notes, was less than fortuitous.

    For "just two weeks after unpacking, on the Friday of the long July 4 weekend, The New York Times carried the first news of the plague.

    In rich detail and with a fine texture that benefits from his insider position, France charts the disease's spread as well as the heroic and flawed human efforts to contain it.

    Grippingly narrative and action-packed, the book astutely characterizes such key figures as Dr. Joe Sonnabend, one of the first doctors to sound the alarm when he noticed the shockingly high incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma in gay men, and the controversial author Larry Kramer, who "found the sexual Olympics" in the gay community "unnerving" and "was Jane Austen in Erica Jong's world," but who was one of the first to act, writing in the New York Native, that "In the past, we have often been a divided community; I hope we can all get together on this emergency, undivided, cohesively, and with all the numbers we in so many ways possess.

    Dec 11, Mark Hiser rated it it was amazing Shelves: activism , history-current-events , bio-autobio-autobio-novel , lgbtq , politics , health-sexuality-etc , diversity-social-justice.

    Last evening, the President of the United States issued a proclamation in commemoration of those who have died, and are living with, one of the worst plagues of modern history.

    Though other events later occurred to bring about more equality, many historians consider the Stonewall Inn riots of to be the start of the modern gay rights movement.

    While the book focuses on the LGBT community, it ultimately is about how a group of people refused to die in silence and, in their refusal, changed the world in which we all live.

    It is haunting non-fiction book also a film rich in details of what is best and worst in politicians, scientists, journalists, friends and family, and people on the street.

    It is a narrative of problem-solving, luck, perseverance, community, anger, hope, and love. It also brings to light human compassion, hatred, silence, action, desperation, indifference, competition, and greed.

    How to Survive a Plague is study of how the collective history of oppression of LGBTQ persons has shaped that community and caused it to loudly proclaim it will not go back into hiding and, while the book saddens and angers the reader, it also celebrates a community called to creativity, tenacity, love, and action.

    View 1 comment. Jan 29, Michael H. This is an astonishing book. Including the glossary and notes, it tops pages. I am not a fast reader, and I read it in a week.

    I should say at the outset that I had a personal interest in the material, having lost a partner to AIDS in Boston in and many friends in the subsequent years.

    This book has frequently been compared to Randy Shilts' "And the Band Played On" but is more tightly focussed on the formation of ACT UP and its impact on the ultimate development of life-saving drugs.

    De This is an astonishing book. Despite a staggering amount of detail, I was never bored and rarely confused, a testament to Mr.

    France's meticulous presentation of material. While it often reads as a chronicle of failures, both by government officials and pharmaceutical companies, the author never lets the reader move away from a connection to real people doing deeply committed work under the worst possible circumstances.

    I cared about them personally and ached for their suffering as year after year passed with only AZT, a drug toxic for most patients and with terrible side effects, to turn to.

    I hope that there is a special place in Hell for Burroughs-Wellcome executives, Ronald Reagan, Archbishop John O'Conner and Senator Jesse Helms, people who intentionally held back progress on finding a cure for AIDS for their own financial benefit or out of some perverted religious belief.

    I bought a copy of the documentary of the same name last year and was deeply moved. There is a visceral difference between reading about Peter Staley scaling the entrance to buildings at the FDA and the NIH and seeing a video taken of the event.

    I watched the dvd again after finishing the book and felt devastated all over again. Reading the book had deepened my understanding of what happened and my love for the people involved, and seeing them on film, so many of whom died, broke my heart.

    It's worth having your heart broken to read this book. Dec 19, Sarah Rosenberger rated it really liked it Shelves: audiobook , history , lgbtq , cultural-studies , science.

    By the time I was old enough to really understand what AIDS was, the YM magazines I read were already full of articles about pretty blonde girls living with the disease, detailed info about condom use, and the oft-repeated reminder that, "anyone can get AIDS.

    This book brings into stark relief the hardships endured by those touched by AIDS during the disease's first decade. France refers to AIDS as a plague, and while that might seem a bit melodramatic at first, after several hundred pages of deaths and suffering, that wording becomes undeniable.

    France humanizes the crisis by including both his own experiences as a gay man living in New York during the height of the epidemic, and those of the scientists, activists, politicians, and journalists working on AIDS, whose personalities are clearly shown, warts and all.

    The last half of the the book started to get a bit bogged down by the huge cast of chemicals and characters, and by France's verbatim transcripts of ACT UP meetings and the petty squabbles between rival groups, but I suppose there's no way to avoid that.

    Growing up in the 80s I really had no awareness of the spread of Aids in America. It was only during my teenage years in the 90s when I came out and befriended other gay people that I became more knowledgeable about the virus.

    With an estimated 35 million people having died from Aids and another 37 million people currently living with it, this is something which affects everyone but particularly people in the gay community.

    Jul 03, Mrs. Danvers rated it really liked it Shelves: medical-narrative , nonfiction , wellcome-prize-nominee. It seems so long ago now but sometimes it seems like yesterday.

    I'm grateful for this inside perspective on the fight to get "drugs into bodies. May 04, Edward Rathke rated it it was amazing.

    This history of the AIDS epidemic, which is also parts memoir and biography, is fascinating for a number of reasons. One of them is that none of these people who drove AIDS research forward are generally remembered.

    I, at least, was not familiar with any of them, excepting Dr Fauci. It's interesting to read this during a pandemic where Dr Fauci also stands at the head of leadership.

    During the current crisis, he's seen as a hero trying to save the lives of millions, but during the AIDS epidemic, This history of the AIDS epidemic, which is also parts memoir and biography, is fascinating for a number of reasons.

    During the current crisis, he's seen as a hero trying to save the lives of millions, but during the AIDS epidemic, as described here, he's sort of a smiling villain, along with Reagan and George HW Bush.

    It's a strange but somewhat fitting contrast, I think, for a public official. Yesterday's villains can become today's heroes.

    Too, in light of what I've read here, I wonder how much he's actually responsible for the US' abysmal response to Covid I don't typically like my histories to meld and slosh around with memoir, but France manages it in such a way that it feels not only natural but integral to the broader history.

    This history is really about young gay men dying by the thousands and fighting for the lives of those they hoped would live past their death. Because this tragedy played out in real time, in front of a nation that tried to ignore it, it seems fitting that the broader history be so directly tied to gay culture in New York, of which France was a notable member.

    What's most fascinating about this book, though, is learning how those dying of AIDS changed the way research was done and drugs were approved by the FDA.

    Not just non-scientists, but actual patients being driving and directing forces in the process and nature of treatment development for the disease they were dying from.

    It's astonishing, really, especially given what I thought I knew about the scientific research method. But, yes, a big powerful book of unlikely heroes who had to die by the tens of thousands before anyone with power took the necessary steps to save their lives.

    Aug 26, George Fenwick rated it it was amazing. Sep 08, Saige rated it it was amazing. I'm not crying, you're crying.

    This book is beautiful, sad, and somehow still incredibly relevant decades after the peak of the AIDS epidemic. I loved how it celebrated the accomplishments of leaders in the gay community while also admitting that they were often wrong and frustratingly human.

    Kramer, for example, was both an amazing leader and an incredibly petty man who took his frustrations out on the people around him. Very well-written, researched, and with a powerful personal touch, this bo I'm not crying, you're crying.

    Very well-written, researched, and with a powerful personal touch, this book is an amazing one for anyone curious about the history of AIDS in America.

    I heard an interview that David France did on the Nov. It was an interesting interview, and ultimately one that motivated me to pick up the book. France interweaves his personal narrative with the political and medical transgressions of the AIDS epidemic.

    I found the buyers clubs and the underground drug market particularly fascinating even when the drugs DIDN'T work, there was no evidence of the drugs working, people knew they didn't work, I heard an interview that David France did on the Nov.

    I found the buyers clubs and the underground drug market particularly fascinating even when the drugs DIDN'T work, there was no evidence of the drugs working, people knew they didn't work, but yet were sustained through these underground drug networks.

    The "what the hell" drugs, and the suicide accounts perfectly exemplified the desperation and hopelessness that many experienced at the time between and As a result of the epidemic, you can see the loose ties to the deregulation of big pharma.

    At one time it would take a drug as long as 7 years to gain approval for distribution. During the AIDS epidemic time was of the essence and it was rare for one to live with AIDS for 7 years, when the given life expectancy was roughly 18 to 22 months at that time.

    So it was important to get drug trials underway and get drugs approved. It raises the question of patient freedom in their own treatment and what they want to take.

    This was actually an interesting shift in the book, where the fight and purpose of ACT UP started as getting drugs into bodies, and then once a relationship was built with the NIH and drug manufacturers, the shift was "well, is the goal to put drugs into bodies OR is it to prolong the lives of those living with AIDS?

    I'm not entirely convinced that one would need to read both books, as they are similar in message. I've read both, and both are good.

    Though I would not suggest reading them back-to-back as the information would get redundant. Once Crixivan was proven at thwart HIV, the glimpse into the survivor's remorse was interesting.

    To follow the lives of the activists who had lost so many friends and loved ones. Some turned to drugs others didn't really know how to adjust to a life without fear.

    Nov 12, Frederico rated it it was amazing. This is probably one of the most important books I've read in my life.

    That period also marks one the lowest points in not only the fight against AIDS but also of rabid homophobia in the West.

    Homosexuals were viewed then as not only perverted, but also as plagued and lethally contagious.

    Safeguard yourself and your loved ones against a potential plague epidemic by avoiding contact with pests, practicing strong sanitation and hygiene and seeking immediate medical attention if you think you may have been exposed to the disease.

    To survive the plague, take steps to avoid getting infected, such as staying away from dead animals or wearing flea repellant.

    You should also bathe regularly and wash your hands with disinfectant several times per day. To get assistance, you should contact the Centers for Disease Control as soon as you or someone you know contracts the plague.

    To learn more from our Physician co-author, such as the symptoms of plague or when to get tested, keep reading the article! Did this summary help you?

    Yes No. Random Article. Home Random Terms of Use. We use cookies to make wikiHow great. By using our site, you agree to our cookie policy. Cookie Settings.

    How to Survive a Plague. Explore this Article parts. Tips and Warnings. Related Articles. Article Summary.

    Co-authored by Chris M. Part 1 of Reduce rodent habitats around the home. Plague is spread through populations of infected rats and the bites of fleas that use them as hosts.

    Eliminate possible nesting places for rodents in and around your home. Tool sheds, brush piles, basements, garages and attics should all be checked for signs of infestation.

    If you happen to find rodent excrement, remove it quickly and carefully, as the plague bacteria can survive and be passed on through contact with infected feces.

    Always wear gloves and some type of breathing protection a medical mask or tied handkerchief when cleaning rat droppings to prevent contracted the disease yourself.

    Avoid contact with sick or dead animals. After an animal has died, the Yersinia bacteria can remain active in its tissues or in fleas that it carries.

    Stay away from animals that have become ill or succumbed to plague symptoms. Plague may spread from diseased tissues or fluids to a living host. Their technicians are equipped with protective gear and can remove potentially infected carcasses with minimal health risk.

    Use flea repellent when spending time outside. Wear a repellent spray or rub containing DEET if you plan on spending a lot of time outside.

    One of the most common means of plague transmission is through the bites of fleas that burrow into the fur of rodents and feed on infected blood.

    DEET and other repellents will keep fleas away, and keep you safe. DEET repellent sprays are safe to use directly on the skin and pose no threat of environmental harm.

    Bathe thoroughly and regularly. Plague bacteria can enter through the delicate tissues of the mouth, nose and eyes. Practice good basic hygiene habits and be aware of risk factors in your environment.

    The disease spreads easily to sensitive tissues, and you never know when you might have touched something carrying traces of the bacteria.

    Part 2 of Acquire medication to stop the disease. In some cases, medication can be prescribed to people whom pathologists have reason to believe may have been exposed to plague.

    These drugs bind to and eradicate Yersinia bacteria in the bloodstream before it has a chance to multiply. If you believe you or someone you know might be at risk of contracting the disease, talk to a doctor about your options.

    It is uncertain if or when a new vaccine will be formulated. Seek immediate medical attention. Once an individual has been infected, the only course of action is to treat the disease with powerful antibiotics.

    Most hospitals keep these antibiotics on hand in case of epidemic emergencies. Young children, the old and infirm are at the greatest risk.

    Plague infects the blood as it spreads through the bloodstream, attacks lymphatic sites and can eventually lead to toxic shock and necrosis of tissues.

    Isolate infected parties. For the safety of those around them, people who have caught the plague need to be safely isolated until they receive treatment.

    The CDC has offices all over the United States and can dispatch personnel to collect and treat the infected party. Keep a distance of at least 3 feet from anyone who may be infected with an airborne form of the plague.

    Part 3 of Know if your location has had instances of the plague before. Breakouts of the plague are more prevalent in rural areas that are overpopulated.

    These areas typically tend to have poor sanitation and more rodents. Most frequently, the plague affects areas in Africa.

    Know if your occupation puts you at risk for the plague. Veterinarians and their assistants, who come in contact with animals on a daily basis, are more likely to contract the plague.

    People who work outdoors are also more prone to becoming infected. See if your hobbies put you at risk for the plague. Outdoor activities like camping put people more at risk for developing the plague.

    Be especially cautious if you are in an area you know has been infected by the plague. Take extra precautions not to be bitten by animals or bugs.

    How To Survive A Plague

    How To Survive A Plague Ihre Vorteile bei bücher.de

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    How to Survive a Plague

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